October, 2018 - Lowell Smith Photography

Sherman County resident Lowell Smith is the Sherman County Historical Museum Featured Artist for October 2018.

Lowell was born and raised in Grass Valley, Oregon, and after graduating from Oregon State University he returned to the farm in 1975 raising his family and retiring in 2011.

Lowell got his first camera in 1964 taking photos of family, holidays and school events and in 2003, he got his first digital camera. After years of taking snapshots and using seven different cameras, Lowell began to use photo software and find the creative artist side of photography.

Lowell’s photos of the county are on display in the Sherman County Courthouse and he is an active member of the Sherman County Photography Club. He enjoys landscape photography, night photography and capturing the outdoor beauty along his hiking adventures.

Please visit the museum to view Lowell Smith’s photos. There is no charge for this exhibit which is on display in the lobby of the museum for the month of October.  The award-winning Museum in Moro is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October.

August, 2018 - Abbey Phelps, Kitting & Fiber Arts

Abbey Phelps has always felt a need to create art. Though she has worked in many mediums, when she found knitting and fiber arts she was “hooked”. Beginning knitting in 2010, she quickly found that she enjoyed the challenge of creating complicated knit lace. She released her first pattern in 2011. Each of these pieces was designed and knit by Abbey, the patterns for each are published independently on Ravelry.com. Her patterns have also been featured in Vogue Knitting and published by Imperial Stock Ranch.

Her favorite medium is silk and merino wool yarn. The merino wool adds softness and memory to the yarn which allows the yarn to remember its open shape and shows the lace pattern to its fullest. The silk adds shine and strength to the yarn and helping to keep each shawl looking its best for as long as possible.

Each item displayed takes between 10 hours and 80 hours to complete. Many of the pieces are beaded with small glass beads. The pieces that change color are created using 4 to 6 skeins of yarn, each dyed a different combination of colors.

The triangular shawls are knit from a single stitch in the center top, increasing in size on subsequent rows. The rounds shawls are knit from the center stitch and knit in circular rounds rather than rows. The green shawl displayed on the mannequin has over 1,000 stitches on each of the final few rounds and uses over 2,000 beads. You can view more of her work at ravelry.com/designers/abigailphelps.

July, 2018 - Linda Krasfic, Baby Quilts

The Sherman County local Artist Series is featuring Quilting by Linda Krafsic for the month of July at the Sherman County Historical Museum.  Linda learned to sew as a member of her 4-H club and while attending Home Economics Class at Sherman County High School.  Growing up Linda made many of her own clothes but realized in her 20's that some clothes could be purchased for less than what it cost to make them and her projects turned to making a few simple quilts before finding a new hobby.

 Linda put her sewing on the back burner for a number of years when she took up the hobby of counted cross stitch until her eyes no longer focused well on close-up hand work.  After she and her husband retired and began spending their winters in Arizona, Linda's Arizona neighbor got her interested in quilting.  She enjoyed making table runners and baby or lap quilts since they didn't take much time to make and they made good gifts.  Linda has donated quilts for different fund raisers and after her brother Dean Macnab received chemotherapy the Celilo Center in The Dalles, she donated a quilt to Celilo Center.

 Please visit the museum to see Quilts by Linda Krafsic. There is no charge for this exhibit which is on display in the lobby of the museum for the month of July.The award-winning Museum in Moro is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October.

10/2/2015 - Jerrine Belshe

October is the last month of the local Artist Series at the Sherman County Historical Museum and is featuring oil paintings by Jerrine Belshe.   Jerrine was born and raised in Grass Valley, Oregon and attended Grass Valley Grade School, Moro High School and was a member of the first graduating class of Sherman Union High School in 1957.  Working and living briefly in Pullman, Washington, Jerrine and husband Jim Belshe headed back to Sherman County after Jim graduated from Washington State University in 1961 and began a lifetime of ranching and raising their 3 children.

Jerrine’s art experience began at a class in Moro, Oregon given by Loleta Miller Smith Martin in 1978.  That painting she created at her first art class is among the amazing artwork and variety of pictures that she has on display this month in the museum lobby.  Jerrine enjoys all types of art.  Through the years she has tried different mediums, from pastels to watercolors and drawing but always seems to go back to creating with the oil paints.  Jerrine has a love of drawing and painting and the challenge to bring a picture to life on a flat canvas with her pallet of colors.  She still uses the rules she learned in those first art classes and continues to still have fun creating art.

Jerrine Belshe Lobby Wall all paintings 2015.jpg

9/15/2015 - Jeremy Lanthorn

Jermey Lanthorn Lobby Wall_sept2015.jpg

The Sherman County local Artist Series is featuring photography by Jeremy Lanthorn for the month of September at the Sherman County Historical Museum.  Jeremy, his wife Kara (Blagg), children T’Sharra and Jacob moved to Sherman County in 2011 and live out of Grass Valley.  They have strong family roots here in the county and quickly settled into to country life and Jeremy can be  seen at many school events taking sports photos for Sherman Jr/Sr High School.

Jeremy has always loved photography.  While in college Jeremy took some photography courses and has progressed over time from the dark room to the digital world.  In 2008, before his daughter T’Sharra was born, he purchased his first digital camera and has been learning and improving his photography every day.  Jeremy loves learning new things about his camera and always working to get the best shot.  He continues to perfect his art by learning from the best, whether through listening to photography podcasts, YouTube videos, reading articles, studying other photographer's work or just following them around.  It is easy to see Jeremy’s passion for photography grows more each day, “My goals as a photographer are to capture memories of events and families, shoot live action sporting events, especially wrestling, and using my camera to show things that you wouldn’t otherwise be able to see.”

7/7/2015 - Paula King

The Sherman County local Artist Series is featuring Quilting by Paula King for the month of July at the Sherman County Historical Museum. Paula has lived most of her life in Sherman County. She grew up in Wasco and has spent the last 44 years with her husband Jeff in Grass Valley, Oregon. In 2006 at the local quilt shop, Lisa’s In Stitches, Paula made her first quilt and has been hooked on quilting ever since. Paula has become an accomplished quilt maker and said she received help from Nationally Published Quilter, Sharon Tucker whom she still works with on projects. Paula has taken many different classes over the years and wishes she had more time to dedicate to her quilting hobby. “This is something I enjoy very much…” Paula said when talking about her love of quilting. If you enjoy quilts and quilting projects that are beautiful you will not want to miss out on viewing Paula’s artwork during the month of July!

5/5/2015 - Sherman Elementary Students

 The 2015 Featured Artists for May at the Sherman County Historical Museum are the Sherman Elementary students.  Displayed on the museum lobby wall, visitors can enjoy the bursts of color that will welcome you all month long.  Their fabulous creations of artwork have brought spring indoors.  From watercolors to oil pastels the artwork is cheery and bright.   You will enjoy a close up encounter with sunflowers or earth art to celebrate Earth Day plus many more themes and styles of art.  Thank you Sherman Elementary for sharing your talents!

10/14/2014 - Sherman County Crafting Ladies

On any given day you can find a group of very talented ladies gathering in Sherman County to visit, support and create together some the most beautiful and crafty works of art you will find in Rural America.  These country ladies not only create for themselves they also create for charity.  This month they have a display on the lobby wall of the Sherman County Historical Museum and they are October’s featured artists.  

It started years ago, these ladies coming together, and over time they have moved their locations around the county.  These days the basement of the Moro Presbyterian Church is a weekly hot spot for being crafty and on the 3rd Thursday of the month you can find them at the museum.  Besides the oodles of wonderful gifts for friends and families these ladies have blessed babies to the elderly with hundreds of items being donated to those in need from our local schools to as far away as Haiti.  They have made blankets, diapers, lap quilts, walker-baskets as well as notecards.  Did I mention most of them are artists, painters and photographers too?  

9/10/2014 - Donna Birtwistle

Donna Birtwistle, of Moro, Oregon, has brought South Africa to the Sherman County Historical Museum displaying and sharing her travels, adventures and selected hand painted art work collected from Cape Town to Botswana.  Enjoy viewing the photos on the museum lobby wall and her personal scrapbook for all visitors to view.  The Sherman County Artist Series is always free of charge and Donna’s South African Travels will be exhibited during the month of September.

7/3/2014 - Art From the Archives

Make a stop at  the Sherman County Historical Museum and see what the Museum Team dug out and dusted off from the archive collection to be displayed for July’s Sherman County Artist Series.  In the museum lobby enjoy a variety of Sherman County treasures featuring Sherman County artists from over one hundred years ago.  Captured in this display you will find local residents with their tractors in downtown Moro, beautiful hand-colored black and white photos of Pacific Northwest Mountains and prize stock on exhibit in Sherman County.

6/1/2014 - Jessica and Karolyn Kaseberg

The Sherman County local Artist Series at the Sherman County Historical Museum features European Travels by Jessica and Karolyn Kaseberg from June 1-30.  Visit Germany, Norway, Greece and Turkey with these Sherman County sisters and view the display in the museum lobby of photos and items from their holiday spent in Germany and Norway.  The Kaseberg sisters have been a host family for two exchange students over the past few years and visiting Europe gave them an opportunity to spend time learning, experiencing and getting to see where home was for their exchange students.
 
Also on display are photos of Greece and Turkey where Jessica studied aboard through the University of Montana Western this spring.
 
Jessica Kaseberg and Karolyn Kaseberg are home grown Sherman County girls raised on a wheat ranch not far from Wasco, Oregon with parents Chris and Carrie Kaseberg.  This fall Jessica will attend Oregon State University and Karolyn will be a senior at Sherman Junior Senior High School in Moro, Oregon.  Both girls have gone many places traveling the country and world with their family.  

5/20/2014 - Sherman Elementary Students

Spring has arrived here at the Sherman County Historical Museum.  The Sherman Elementary Students have brought sunflowers and spring into the Sherman County Historical Museum with their fabulous artwork!  Displayed on the museum lobby wall, visitors can enjoy the bursts of color that will welcome you during the month of May.
 
From paint to pastels the artwork is cheery and bright.  Beautiful landscapes, giraffes, pigs and sunflowers are a few of the many pictures everyone will enjoy viewing!  
 

8/1/2013 - Hollee Kaseberg

After a horse gets rescued from life-threatening neglect or abuse have you ever wondered where that horse might end up?  Bring the family out to the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro, OR and learn from Hollee Kaseberg’s wonderful display which tells touching stories of the non-profit equine rescue ministry Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch. 

Rescued horses that call Crystal Peaks home each have an incredible story of rescue, recovery and purpose as they are used to help kids.  At the Youth Ranch a horse is partnered with one leader and one child for a session where the child, who is often as broken and disadvantaged as the horse once was, learns of the promise of hope, love, family and faith.

5/5/2013 - Sherman Elementary Students

They have done it again!  The Sherman Elementary Students have brought sunshine and spring into the Sherman County Historical Museum with their fabulous artwork!  Displayed on the museum lobby wall, visitors can enjoy the bursts of color that will welcome you during the month of May.
 
From paint to pastels the artwork is impressive.  Beautiful landscapes, giraffes, pigs and sunflowers are a few of the many pictures everyone will enjoy viewing! 

10/1/2012 - Myrna Melzer

The Sherman County Historical Museum at Moro, Oregon, is proud to feature Moro resident and long-term museum volunteer Myrna Melzer as our "Local Artist of the Month" for October. Myrna's wonderful art in pencil, colored pencil, and oils, titled "The New Kids on the Block" features parenting in the 'animal world'. This is the last of the Sherman County artist exhibits for our 2012 season which ends October 31.

8/27/2012 - Pat Jacobsen

Sherman County Historical Museum’s Sherman County Artist Series features Pat Jacobsen’s work, A Heart for Art, September 1-30. 
 
Patricia Coats Jacobsen is an artist, mother, daughter, grandmother, mother-in-law, wife, sister, friend, patient, Baha’i, Sherman County native and world citizen – not necessarily in that order. Pat and her husband Erling live in Rufus now, but she grew up on a wheat farm east of Wasco. From an early age she was inspired by the beauty surrounding her, and has always expressed the love of that beauty through her art.
 
Pat studied art at the University of Oregon and Western Oregon University. Later she took hand-lettering classes at Portland Community College. Thus began her career as a sign artist, later practicing computerized sign-design and sign-making. 
 
According to Myrna Melzer, the Museum’s exhibit team leader, visitors will see her work in exhibits and in vinyl lettering, in the Oregon Trail map and the overhead-quotes in the new exhibit, Sherman County Journal: Paper, Ink and Presses. 

Over the years Pat has taken classes from various artists in the Mid-Columbia area. In ’06 she took a weekend class from pastel artist Judith Cunningham. She found her passion! Many of the paintings in this show stem from that period.
 
In recent years Pat has become interested in photography and has incorporated photos into her paintings. In this show, an example of that is the black and white painting of Celilo Falls. 
 
Most recently, Pat’s art has taken an unusual direction, painting on old, corrugated metal roofing. These paintings are inspired by photographs taken by her late father, Chet Coats. The example in this show represents harvest at the Liberty Place, circa 1948, the year Pat was born. It was a “bumper crop.” 
 
Most of Pat’s artwork reflects something in Sherman County. It’s in her heart and soul. 

9/27/2011 - Myrna Melzer

Next up in the Sherman County Historical Museum’s Sherman County Artist Series through October is Myrna Melzer’s Colored Pencil Therapy: It’s All in the Eyes.
 
Myrna’s artistic expertise is visible in the mural, hand-drawn maps and illustrations in the award-winning interpretive exhibit, Oregon Trails, Rails and Roads. A volunteer since 1992, she serves as a museum host during the summer season, chairs the exhibit team, and recently prepared and mounted quilts for storage.
 
Oregon Days of Culture, October 1-8, honors the role of the arts, humanities, and heritage in our everyday lives. Celebrate by visiting the Museum in Moro where the work of local artists and artisans is displayed in quilts, paintings, illustrations, embroidery, maps, murals, garments, carpentry and photography.